Pretoria Girls Hair: A much deeper issue

If we want to reduce inequality, we do that by educating people with the best, quality education we can afford to give them. Im not sure if wearing your hair as you want to is adding much value to that goal.
If we want to reduce inequality, we do that by educating people with the best, quality education we can afford to give them. Im not sure if wearing your hair as you want to is adding much value to that goal.

By David Viaene

There is more depth to this than most people realize.

I remember being told to cut my hair at school, even though that was not its natural state. Because I have to cut my hair, away from its natural state… did that make the governing body racist?

Unpractical rules need to be changed, but just because a rule doesnt fit you, does not make it racist? Unthoughtful? Yes. bureaucratic, yes. Racist… not sold on that yet.

To me, a racist rule would be that I have to cut my hair but people with a different ethnicity to me, dont have to have short neat hair at school (I went to an all boys school).

And I think that girl that caused all of this has beautiful hair, I just hope we see as much passion for hair styles as we do in creating cheap, high quality education. These RhodesMustFall and Hairstyle protests seem to keep us from focusing on these issues rather than helping them.

If we want to reduce inequality, we do that by educating people with the best, quality education we can afford to give them. Im not sure if wearing your hair as you want to is adding much value to that goal. Saying that, I do hope she gets to wear her hair up, it looks stunning.




  • Councillor David Viaene is an analyst, and activist for equality and equity. He writes in his personal capacity. He has contributed immensely to the establishment on non-racial societies all across Africa. Views expressed in this article are his personal views and not those of the party he represents.