No Ubuntu In Opposition Politics, Consequently No Victory Either

Zimbabwe's collective problems are the architecture of Zanu PF. The failure of opposition parties to unite against a common enemy raises questions about their motives and the divisions play into Zanu hands.
Zimbabwe's collective problems are the architecture of Zanu PF. The failure of opposition parties to unite against a common enemy raises questions about their motives and the divisions play into Zanu hands.

By Vokal Da Poet

Zimbabweans are a communal people schooled in ubuntu and the concept one oneness. When a person has a problem, it is a rule that communities unite first to solve a problem and then solve their individual differences in the aftermath. Somehow this concept escapes the many opposition parties. It indicts them and costs them too.

I am a very simple man. With very simple tastes.

I struggle with the modern concept of family where my father’s brother’s sons are called cousins. For me they are brothers. And instead of uncle, I refer to my father’s brother as father.

In the community where I was raised, I was taught to perceive every adult as a parental figure, and I accorded them the respect that befits a parent. And they treated me like one of their own.

There is no way I would be found huddled together on a street corner with a girl from down the street feeling every inch of her body that I possibly can, unconcerned about who sees me because my parents are either at work or safely ensconced in their home.

That same community made me view the children of my parents’ close friends, not as easy prey (if they are female), but rather as siblings. The family unit was a very important component in my upbringing. We did not fail to look beyond the nuclear family unit.

When a misfortune befell any one of us within the community, it took the effort of the community to assist the struggling family. We came together and helped each other through the worst.

In the event of a funeral, it was the community that buried the deceased, not the family of the deceased.

We buried our own. We mourned with our own. And we consoled our own. It wasn’t much as I witness in this the ‘modern’ age where we are all so disconnected, and do not even work towards a common goal.

For instance, if there is a large percentage of Zimbabwean citizens that agree that the ZANU PF administration has failed the people and it is time to explore the alternative, then what is the point of having 5 candidates competing?

Look, ZANU PF still has a large following… I known this sounds odd. But it is true. If they did not, then they would not be able to rig any elections. Because they would not have anything to work with.

For one to rig an election, they ought to have something to work with.

So then, having 5 or 3 or whatever, just more than one party competing with ZANU PF actually makes the job easier for them to rig, or even allows them the luxury of not rigging because suddenly the community that wants them out of power is now divided into two or more groups.

Already the community is broken. There is no more communal activity. And after failing to unseat them, the myriad opposition parties resort to mudslinging and all sorts of rubbish that follows.

But I the simple man am left puzzled, asking: what’s the point?

In my simplicity I will conclude that all these opposition parties do not care about my wishes,  but instead only about their ego. They just want to be seen as that one person who removed the administration.

They want the glory of the most powerful office. Because to my simple mind, if that was not all that they wanted, then they would have first come together, joined hands and unseated the administration that no one wanted. Then afterwards, deal with each other.

As Africans, we first bury the deceased before we start discussing what to do with the deceased’s estate. We do not do it before his/her death, neither do we do it before burial. Otherwise what is the point of calling yourself their family if you do?